Thursday, November 5, 2009

Holy Bible Mosaic


Note* Sporadically throughout the day, one of the contributors to Holy Bible Mosaic will be stopping in and looking at the posted comments. If you have a question, feel free to ask. Plus, anyone who comments between today and November 12 will be entered into a contest to win a free copy of Holy Bible Mosaic.

The first thing I noticed about Holy Bible Mosaic is that there is a clear division between the devotional section of the Bible and the Bible itself. Most of the devotional Bibles I’ve run across have the information spread throughout the pages of actual text. I’m a very linear person so the scattered-ness of it all really bothered me. I would find myself jumping back and forth, forgetting what I had just read and not being able to concentrate. Mosaic makes it a point to stray from this norm. You’ve got the text and the devotional, clear, cut and concise. Very much appreciated.

Another thing has bothered me about devotional Bibles was there really wasn’t much that tied the extra information together other than a theme. With Mosaic, the devotional section is based upon the church calendar, which prior to reading Mosaic I had never really considered. Advent was nothing more than a box of chocolates before Christmas and Lent meant my friends who went to other churches had to give up something fun. Mosaic walks through the church calendar and not only delivers nuggets of inspiration but also a very small lesson in the church’s foundational calendar.

The third piece that really rounds out the devotional section for me is the beautiful artwork. Though I can’t help but see a depiction of “Master Shake” from Aqua Teen Hunger Force in the “Bread and Fish Mosaic” featured on the cover and on “Epiphany, Week 4” (yes, I did just mention that in a Bible review), the artwork contained in the pages is stunning. None of this wanna-be cool, teen targeted graphic design that modern Christian publications seem so apt to include. The works of art contained in Mosaic are actual masterpieces in vivid color from all over the world.

The devotionals themselves, when viewed for substance, are quite good. Strewn with a mix of suggested scriptures, background information, printed verses, meditations, quotes and commentaries, a new and refreshing mix has been developed. With Mosaic, you don’t just have one person’s opinions over and over again. True to its name, Mosaic is constructed of a patchwork of the human population both modern and historical.

Overall, I think that Holy Bible Mosaic is a worthwhile publication that’s true to itself. NLT is not a translation I’ve read a lot of before but I do find the differences between translations interesting and sometimes enlightening. If you’re in the market for a new or additional Bible, at least stop by your local Christian bookstore and take a look for yourself. Or you could comment on this posting and win yourself a free copy of Holy Bible Mosaic. Any comments I receive on this post, between now and November 12 will be entered into a drawing. The winner will be announced on the 12th.

10 comments:

Realtorgirl said...

I've personally seen this Bible and it does look REALLY cool. The cover is very unique and eye-catching, in a good way. The art work inside is pretty awesome too. Everything about it makes it LOOK really neat... I guess my question lies with the emphasis that this Bible puts on the Advent and Lent. Is this a Catholic/Lutheran-type version of the Bible? With it's paraphrasing, does it stray from the solid theology of what my old school New King James version holds?

Thanks for answering questions today! What a great idea!

Erin Pagliaro said...

What translation is it ? and do the they follow the bible in chronological order? Is this for teens?

Mark said...

In the devotional section, each Sunday of the church year has texts assigned to it from the lectionary.

But since the readings for the lectionary are spread out over a three year period, I'm wondering how the editor(s) chose the particular texts they did for each Sunday.

Addie Domske said...

Sounds great, Josh. Thanks for letting me know about this...I'll check it out! : )

Jake said...

The subject of denomination does concern me as well. I'm also interested in what sort of issues or subject matter the devotional touches on. Are they generic or challenging to someone who has been a Christian for a while?

Jake said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mark said...

Nothing in the devotional section strikes me as particularly "denominational" though its clear that various denominations are represented.

My hunch is that people from any Christian tradition/practice might be surprised or bothered by some of the authors included. That is to say, a Lutheran might wonder why Author X is included and a Baptist might wonder why the writings of Pope Y are there.

That, in itself, make Mosaic a delight and a challenge. It opens us to authors we might not otherwise be inclined to ever read.

alicia* said...

this is a great post! Thanks! I'll check it out!

Jesse said...

I'm still somewhat confused on what this is, a paraphrase? A devotional? A bible? All 3? Does it differ from the NLT other than the devotional sections/artwork?

Mark said...

Jesse, the Mosaic Bible has two parts in one volume. The first part is devotional with Biblical texts appointed for each Sunday of the church year and reflections from various Christians writers. The second half is just the straightforward NLT translation.